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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN2 8
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CNNW 2
CSPAN 1
MSNBCW 1
WRC (NBC) 1
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English 19
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
husband was another international guy. he was in indonesia. she met him at the university of hawaii. he was from the east-west center. brought americans the honolulu to prepare to go to asia for study. and that's where she met him. he was a tennis player. she fell in love with lolo. >> host: at what point did the move to jakarta? >> guest: he went back first. you know, both barack, sr. and lolo were constantly being watched by the ins and different regulations, and so lolo could only stay for a certain amount of time. he kept trying to extend his visa after he married her, and found ways to stay. so we got certain jobs that were related to geography and topography in honolulu to keep them there, but eventually things were changing and very dramatic political ways. he was back in 1966. in 1967, in october, barry obama and his mother moved back to indonesia. >> host: so the president lived in jakarta indonesia from 67-71, ages six through 10? >> guest: just about, yes. about four years. >> host: while you were in jakarta, david maraniss, you found a school where barack obama went to schoo
? >> guest: his mother couldn't afford to send them there. those 3.5 years, he is in indonesia, immersed in the language. the mother is waking up at 4:00 a.m. to teach him with english schoolbooks to supplement his learning. it is very difficult. and the whole process was something that she realized that she loved indonesia, she was still married, she wanted to stay. but it was coming to a point where she had to make a key decision. it turned out that he could get into the best elite private schools in honolulu, so he went back in fifth grade to start their. >> host: he lived with his grandparents in honolulu in an apartment? >> guest: yes, they moved to an apartment. it was five blocks from the school. he lived there from fifth grade through his senior year. >> host: from ages 11 to 18 years old? >> guest: yes, that is correct. there were some subtle changes. his mother to come back. she came back to study in graduate school. they live a couple blocks away for about two years. then she went back indonesia again. the bulk of that. maxima that's what happened. >> host: that was 1971 going
. here i was a young boy with a white mom, a black father, raised in indonesia and hawaii, and i was beginning to sense how fitting in to the world might not be as simple as it might seem. and so to see this man, this senator, this powerful, accomplished person who was nn' out of central casting when it came to what you think a senator might look like at the time, and the way he commanded the respect of an entire nation. i think it hinted to me what might be possible in my own l e life. this was a man who as a teenager stepped up to serve his country even after his fellow japanese-naerns were declared enemy aliens. a man who believed in his country even when his government didn't necessarily believe in him. that meant something to me. it gave me a powerful sense, one that i couldn't put into words, a powerful sense of hope. and as i watched those hearings listening to danny ask all those piercing questions night after night, i learned something else. i learned how our democracy was supposed to work.work. our government of and by and for the people. we had a system government whe
mom, a black father, raised in indonesia and hawaii and i was beginning to sense how fitting into the world might not be as simple as it might seem. so to see this man, this senator, this powerful accomplished person who was not a central cast when it came to what you think a senator might look like at the time, and the way he commanded the respect of an entire nation, i think it hinted to me what might be possible in my own life. this was a man who as a teenager stepped up to serve his country even after his fellow japanese americans were declared enemy aliens. a man who believed in america even when its government didn't necessarily believe in him. that meant something to me. it gave me a powerful sense, one that i couldn't put into words, a powerful sense of hope. as i watched those hearings and listening to danny ask all the piercing questions night after night, i learned something else. i learned how our democracy was supposed to work. our government of and by and for the people. and by and for the people. we have a system of government that nobody is above the law. wher
narrative of a lot of manufacturers leaving china for vietnam, indonesia, bangladesh, mexico. this is really part of a decades-long trend. >> i have to leave it there. gordon chang, thank you very much. be sure to catch the tim cook interview tonight on "rock center with brian williams." that's at 10:00 p.m. central. >>> the french ought to stick with fine foods because we found out that their 75% tax rate on the rich doesn't work. the economy there is tanking, even worse, same story in britain. why would we want to copy their policies here in the usa? i'll try to get some answers in a moment. please stay with us. [ male announcer ] how do you trade? with scottrader streaming quotes, any way you want. fully customize it for your trading process -- from thought to trade, on every screen. and all in real time. which makes it just like having your own trading floor, right at your fingertips. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. try our easy-to-use scottrader streaming quotes. it's another reason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. in that time th
such as the haiti earthquake, indonesia tsunami. she's here and spent the last few days in rooms with some of those children who were in sandy hook sandy hook elementary school on friday. some of those children who had to walk out past the bodies of her classmates. she told me so many stories about their resilience, about how they may or may not be able to cope with what they have seen. she talked about one extraordinarily touching scene where she witnessed children helping children. listen. >> watching one child come in, a young boy come in being very shy and withdrawn and not wanting to talk to anybody and his head down and holding himself. and then watching two young of his school mates, girls, come rushing over to him and hugging him. hi, how are you? and just -- he started to melt a little bit. and they brought him over to where the toys were and they were talking to him and it brought him out of his shell. >> she says every child reacts differently in this kind of traumatic situation, john. she says the bottom line is some will have the resilience, they will have the parental support. they wi
of the tsunami that hit after a massive earthquake off the coast of indonesia. more than 200,000 people died. on thursday we could get the consumer confidence report. we get a consumer confidence report. it will give us an idea of how people are feeling about the strength of the economy, and on friday lots of nervous couples and last minute plans means new same-sex marriage law goes into effect the next day. same-sex partners will be finally able to get married legally there. >>> people usually count their blessings at christmas. cnn's barbara star found soldiers still counting theirs, and they might wonder how they can do it. >> i push forward and open -- my elbow unlocks and and i throw it back, and that's how i maneuver. >> reporter: wounded troops in rehab at the holiday time. all christmas miracles. meet travis mills, one of the troops i visited with asking them to send holiday wishes to their buddies. >> hi, everybody. i'm staff sergeant travis mills fourth brigade combat team. i miss everybody. merry christmas and happy new year. to our military forces overseas and home, and special s
they can make extraordinary strides for the assistance from others. let me cite one example. indonesia, perhaps my favorite example, there the government has dedicated itself to creating the civilian legal structure in law enforcement institutions to fight terrorism effectively, comprehensively, and using the rule of law. in disease has scored more than 100 conservative convictions in terrorist cases and the national police has major successes in breaking up terrorist cells linked to other violent extremists ors and anyone who thinks back eight or nine years or even a decade will remember that many of sauce it athe time indonesia hung in the balance and unlikely to survive. nobody thinks that now. any discussion of the ct landscape of southeast asia is frequently omitted. the play here is the capacity building can work and we must count to innovate. to improve our advocacy. i said at the outset that at the beginning of the administration, we were determined to did a better job of countering violent extremism. let me tell you about our efforts to legitimize the terrorist narrative. unde
from others. but me cite one example. indonesia, perhaps my favorite example. if the government has dedicated itself to creating civilian legal structures and law enforcement institutions to fight terrorism effect in late, comprehensively and within the rule of law. indonesia has scored more than 100 consecutive convictions in terrorist cases for national places had major successes in breaking up terrorist future muslim yet another violent extremists organizations. anyone who thinks back eight or nine years for a decade will remember many of us thought at the time and did misha hung in the balance and was unlikely to survive his bout with extremism. no one thinks that now had any discussion of the landscape in southeast asia is frequently admitted. the point here is capacity building can work it must continue innovate to prove efficacy. it said at the outset that the beginning of the administration were determined to better java countering violent extremism. so then they tell you of our efforts to delegitimize the terrorist narrative. undersecretary clinton's leadership established
guy, lolo soetoro from indonesia. he had come there to the east-west center which brought students from various asian countries to hawaii and brought americans to honolulu to the same center who were prepared to go to asia for different studies. and that's where she met him. he was a tennis player. he was very gregarious at that time and she fell in love with lolo. >> host: at what point did they move to jakarta? >> guest: she went back first. he had been there, you know both barack senior and lolo are constantly be washed by the ins for different regulations on visas and so on. so lolo could only stay for a certain amount of time. he can try to extend his visa after he married her and find out ways to save. because certain jobs he said were related to the geography he had learned and topography in honolulu to keep them there. eventually indonesia was changing and dramatic, political wave and he was forced back in 1966. make to 67 and a covert, barry obama and his mother and so tarot booth that. >> host:
and still emitting a very strong radio signal and it just passed over indonesia. >> what would that mean then if you lose control ever that satellite, what then? >> it could tumble down to earth. here is the big story, the fact that north koreans were able to get this satellite into space in the first place. they had the delivery system on this rocket which is basically the same as -- the same delivery system as there typodone ii system. that is the missile system they've been testing for years and years annex tepbld the range so it could reach the continental united states. this is scary. they are closer to having a missile that could reach the united states. bill: it's far more serious especially when you consider the sanctions on this country. if has been labeled a success, whether you're for it or the rest of the world is against this. i'm going to show you, sir, to our viewers at home here, here is north korea, this missile shot off from the east coast of north korea. you had a little of it land here in the yellow sea and a little bit more down here in the philippines. here is what
currency and commodity trading they're going to end early. in japan, indonesia, the philippines, they were all closed in europe. only the uk, french, dutch and spanish stock markets are open and they're going to be closing early. there are now only five trading sessions left in 2012. get your act together. stocks and bonds, solid gains so far this year. the dow has advanced 8% in total. the s&p 500 up almost 14%. the nasdaq has jumped 16%. it's been a good year. the end of the year also means we are just days away from the fiscal cliff, however, and that's the bad news. and looming tax hikes, spending cuts, all of that. both sides warning a very big deal becoming a bit more unlikely. >> and my one bit of advice to speaker boehner is this. you cannot pass a bill with just republicans. on a broad thing like this, you need both. and he has put himself with plan b and sort of an impossible position. he has to get these hard right goes to go along with him. and he and the president were going to say we're going to pass a deal with the majority of republicans and the majority of democrats in the
nation located strategically between the united states territory of guam, the philippines and indonesia. captured in world war ii, palau became part of the u.s. administered trust territory of the pacific islands. in 1994 it became part of an association which grants the u.s. military rights that the department of state calls -- quote -- "vital to our national security." the compact also provided palau with an initial 15-year assistance and that ended in 2009. the agreement would extend and phase out u.s. assistance by 2024. congress has provided stopgap funding since 2009, but the department of defense wrote to our committee, the committee on energy and natural resources in april of 2011, stating -- quote -- "failure to follow through on our commitments to palau as reflected in the proposed agreement would jeopardize our defense posture in the western pacific." the agreement provides for the phaseout of financial assistance for operation, construction and maintenance. the congressional budget office's ten-year budget estimate for direct spending is $171 million. the u.s. commitment to
mom, a black father, raised in indonesia and hawaii, and i was beginning toceps how fitting in to the world might not be as simple as it might seem. to see this man, this senator, this powerful, accomplished person who was not when it came to what you think a senator might look like at the time. the way he commanded the respect of the entire nation, i think it hinted to me what might be possible in my own life. this was a man who, as a teenager, stepped up to serve his country, even after his fellow japanese-americans were declared enemy aliens. a man who believed in america even when its government didn't necessarily believe in him. that meant something to me. it gave me a powerful sense, one that i couldn't put into words, a powerful sense of hope. as i watched those hearings, listening danny ask those pierces questions night after night, i learned something else. i learned how our democracy was supposed to work, our government, of, and by and for the people. we have a system of government where nobody's above the law, where we have an obligation to hold each other account
father, raised in indonesia and hawaii. i was beginning to sense how fitting in to the world might not be as simple as it might seem. and so to see this man, this senator, this powerful accomplished fern person who was not a central casting when it came to what you think a senator might look like at the time. the way he commanded the respect of an entire nation, i think it hinted to me what might be possible in my own life. this was a man who as a teen stepped up to serve his country even after his fellow japanese americans were declared enemy aliens. a man who believed in america even when the government didn't necessarily believe in him. that meant something to me. it gave me a powerful sense, one they couldn't put in to words, a powerful sense of hope. and as i watched those hearings listening to danny ask all the piercing questions night after night, i learned something else. i learned how or democracy was supposed to work. our government of and by and for the people. we had a system of government where nobody was above the law. we -- we have an obligation to hold each other ac
it was more than that. here i was a young boy with a white mom, a black father, raised in indonesia and hawaii and i was beginning to sense how fitting into the world might not be as simple as it might seem. and so to see this man, this senator, this powerful, accomplished person, who was not a central casting when it what you think a senator might look like at the time. and the way he commanded the respect of an entire nation, i think it hinted to me what might be possible in my own life. this was a man who, as a teenager, stepped up to serve his country even after his fellow japanese-americans were declared enemy aliens. a man who beliefed in america even when its government didn't necessarily believe in him. that meant something to me. it gave me a pow powerful sense, one that i couldn't put into words, a powerful sense of hope. and as i watched those hearings listening to danny ask those piercing questions night after night i learned something else. i learned how our democracy was supposed to work. our government of and by and for the people. that we had a system of government where nobody
father, raised in indonesia and hawaii. i was beginning to sense how fitting into the world might not be as simple as it might seem. and so, to see this man, this center, this powerful an accomplished person, when it came to what you think the senator might look like at the time, the way that he commanded the respect of the entire nation, it hinted to me what might be possible for my own life. this was a man that stepped up to serve his country even after his fellow japanese americans were declared enemy aliens. a man that believed in america even when its government did not necessarily believe in him. that meant something to me. it gave me a powerful sense, one that i could not put into words. as i watched the hearings, listening to his piercing questions night after night, i learned how a democracy was supposed to work. a government of, by, and for the people. nobody is above the law. we have an obligation to hold each other countable. these things that we stand for, the ideals that we hold dear, they are bigger than any one person, party, or politician. nobody communicated that
the world, bought a helmet for a teen in indonesia driving without one. #20acts. join us in remembering the kids in connecticut. a tragedy that ended 26 lives at one school now touching so many. we heard robert parker, the father of one young victim emilie, speak to emotionally over the weekend. he released an additional statement last night, calling on everyone to use the memories of the victims to inspire us to do good and work toward bettering our communities. savannah? >> all right, andrea canning, thank you. out of such sadness, such a great idea to do something kind for somebody else. >> pay it forward. we talk about this all the time. it's sad that tragedy reminds us. >> but that this can live on and honor their memories. >> and you do have an opportunity to elevate this kind of loss. and people i think are trying to do that. that's the best thing to try to do right now. >> best way to remember those that were lost. we are back with much more today on a tuesday morning after a check of your local news and weather. >>> good morning. it's 8:56 on tuesday, december 18th, and i'm aar
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)